Theological Term of the Week: Premillennialism

This week’s term: Premillennialism – That form of eschatological doctrine which teaches that the return of Christ shall occur before the Millennial Kingdom.

Last week’s term: Eschatology – The study of last things, that is death, judgment, heaven, hell, the return of Christ, the Millennial Kingdom, and the new heaven and the new earth.

Theological Term of the Week: Eschatology

This week we begin a new heading: Words and Terms Describing the Study and Teaching of Last Things

This week’s term: Eschatology – The study of last things, that is death, judgment, heaven, hell, the return of Christ, the Millennial Kingdom, and the new heaven and the new earth.

Last week’s term: Free Moral Agency – Funk & Wagnall’s: “The power or capacity to act freely, i.e., without the constraint of the will.” Webster’s New International Dictionary: “Not determined by anything beyond its own nature or being; not necessitated by an external cause or agency; choosing or capable of choosing for itself as a free agent.” (Thomas Paul Simmons Systematic Theology 181)

Theological Term of the Week: Free Moral Agency

This week’s term: Free Moral Agency – Funk & Wagnall’s: “The power or capacity to act freely, i.e., without the constraint of the will.” Webster’s New International Dictionary: “Not determined by anything beyond its own nature or being; not necessitated by an external cause or agency; choosing or capable of choosing for itself as a free agent.” (Thomas Paul Simmons Systematic Theology, 181)

Last week’s term: Free Will – Webster’s definitions: “1. Freedom of decision, or of choice between alternatives. 2. The freedom of the will to choose a course of action without external coercion, but in accordance with the ideals or moral outlook of the individual.” Rightly understood, these are both Bible and Baptist doctrines and can be held affirmatively. However, the common Arminian argument for this term today is that in the fall, man’s will was somehow insulated, so that he may make choices without regard to, or restraint from, his fallen nature. This is absolute heresy.

Theological Term of the Week: Free Will

This week’s term: Free Will – Webster’s definitions:  “1. Freedom of decision, or of choice between alternatives. 2. The freedom of the will to choose a course of action without external coercion, but in accordance with the ideals or moral outlook of the individual.” Rightly understood, these are both Bible and Baptist doctrines and can be held affirmatively. However, the common Arminian argument for this term today is that in the fall, man’s will was somehow insulated, so that he may make choices without regard to, or restraint from, his fallen nature. This is absolute heresy. 

Last week’s term: Antinomianism – Anti (against) nomia (law). The teaching of antinomianism is that whereas Christ is glorified by putting away our sin, the more we sin, the more glorious He becomes in His work of salvation. Therefore, we actually cause the grace of God to abound by sinning.

Theological Term of the Week: Antinomianism

This week’s term: Antinomianism – Anti (against) nomia (law). The teaching of antinomianism is that whereas Christ is glorified by putting away our sin, the more we sin, the more glorious He becomes in His work of salvation. Therefore, we actually cause the grace of God to abound by sinning.

Last week’s term: Pelagianism – The doctrines taught by Pelagius. Pelagius was a monk born in England of great intellectual stature, but no apparent knowledge of God. He taught that man was inherently capable of doing right or wrong, that it was possible for him to live a sinless life, and that some men had actually done so. He taught that Adam’s sin had no real effect on mankind as a race, and that man was free to choose either right or wrong, not having a fallen nature.

Theological Term of the Week: Pelagianism

This week’s term: Pelagianism – The doctrines taught by Pelagius. Pelagius was a monk born in England of great intellectual stature, but no apparent knowledge of God. He taught that man was inherently capable of doing right or wrong, that it was possible for him to live a sinless life, and that some men had actually done so. He taught that Adam’s sin had no real effect on mankind as a race, and that man was free to choose either right or wrong, not having a fallen nature. 

Last week’s term: Arminianism – The system of doctrine which holds salvation is brought about by a cooperative effort between God and man. Again, Arminius was not the originator of this doctrine but simply became identified as the champion of it. Arminianism is a modification of Pelagianism, though most Arminians will deny that they are in agreement with Pelagianism.

Theological Term of the Week: Arminianism

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This week’s term: Arminianism – The system of doctrine which holds salvation is brought about by a cooperative effort between God and man. Again, Arminius was not the originator of this doctrine but simply became identified as the champion of it. Arminianism is a modification of Pelagianism, though most Arminians will deny that they are in agreement with Pelagianism. 

Last week’s term: Calvinism – The system of doctrine which holds salvation is strictly of grace and totally monergistic. This system is often wrongly attributed to John Calvin and thus called after his name, though no one supposes or claims that he was the originator of it.

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