Theological Term of the Week: Ransom

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This week’s term: Ransom – Essentially the same as redemption; in fact, they are interchangeably translated from the Greek; to buy back, or to buy out of bondage. It is very akin to redemption and carries the idea of the price of a bond slave being paid by another, him thus being freed from his state of bondage. The analogies of ransom and redemption teach, not simply the payment of the required price of redemption, but the actual setting free of the one who is redeemed, or ransomed. 

Last week’s term: Redemption – To be purchased or bought back. It is a metaphorical term used in the New Testament to describe the release from the judicial bondage of sin, in which God’s elect inherently dwell. The Biblical idea of redemption carries a view which precludes the possibility of anyone who enjoys this redemption ever, under any circumstance, suffering relapse into bondage or eternal damnation.

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Theological Term of the Week: Redemption

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This week’s term: Redemption – To be purchased or bought back. It is a metaphorical term used in the New Testament to describe the release from the judicial bondage of sin, in which God’s elect inherently dwell. The Biblical idea of redemption carries a view which precludes the possibility of anyone who enjoys this redemption ever, under any circumstance, suffering relapse into bondage or eternal damnation.

Last week’s term:  Reconciliation – The effect of atonement. Essentially, reconciliation is propitiation or atonement in the New Testament sense. That is to say, by the death of Christ we are reconciled to, and at peace with God. Note: The same Greek word is rendered atonement and reconciliation, which is most often true in the Old Testament Hebrew as well. In Christ we have now received (Romans 5:11) the atonement which all the Old Testament gospel types promised. The proper conclusion should be that atonement in the New Testament sense should never be seen as less than total reconciliation to God.

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Series on Calvinism: Part Eight

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This latest sermon was preached two weeks ago. Last week, my husband was preaching at a mission work that the Lord gave our church located in Post, Texas. Their pastor died and we are trying to assist them in keeping their doors open. If you think of it, we would would appreciate your prayers for Grace Baptist Church.

Limited Atonement, Part 2 – September 4, 2016

Previous sermons in this series:

Overview of Calvinism (the TULIP acrostic) – July 17, 2016

Total Depravity – July 24, 2016

Deeper Into Depravity – July 31, 2016

Unconditional Election – August 7, 2016

Unconditional Election, Part 2  – August 14, 2016

Objections to Election – August 21, 2016

Limited Atonement – August 28, 2016

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“Seven Days Are in a Week” (Abeka Song)

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In teaching my first grader with the Abeka homeschooling curriculum, we came upon this song in the most recent edition of their arithmetic material. I am not sure if there is a CD with this song available from Abeka, but even if there is, I don’t have it. I do, however, have a fourteen year old, piano-loving son. He was kind enough to play this song for me a few times so I could learn it and sing it with Matthew. I asked him if he would allow me to record it for any other moms out there who might like to learn it, but (like me) can’t play the piano. You can find the music in the back of the homeschool curriculum guide.

Here are the lyrics:

Seven days are in a week, Sunday church with our families.

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday we’re off to school.

Saturday we play with friends, ride our bikes and clean our rooms.

Count the days of which we speak, seven days are in a week.


Thanks, Mitch, for doing me such a great favor!

I don’t usually request that anyone share my blog posts (but I always appreciate it), however, if you could share this one, or the video on YouTube, I would be most grateful. I hope it might be a help to other moms out there.

Thanks for being here!

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I’m Sorry I’m a Stressed-Out Mom: An Open Letter to My Kids

Dear Children,

When your dad knocked on the door of the brown brick house on Karen Street nineteen years ago to ask your papa for my hand in marriage, your papa wisely told him, “Terry, she’ll need a strong leader.” He said this because he knew my stubborn, determined will better than anyone. One thing he forgot to tell him is that I also needed someone who could tell me to take a deep breath and calm down. Your dad learned the hard way that I get stressed-out easily.

Today, we completed our first day of the homeschooling co-op. It took me three years to build up the courage to commit to this. You have joked with me about how I have counted the number of water bottles too many times and agonized over the lunches you would take. You may not know that I printed out roughly seventeen pages of emails related to co-op. I filled out forms, wrote checks, planned our schedule, and asked more than a few questions of the co-op leaders. (Bless their hearts!)

Today, I worked in the class with the 3-5 year olds. One little girl became a fast friend. We talked about her doll and I encouraged her to keep her backpack unzipped because her doll needed some air. I was just trying to make conversation with her, but she took me quite literally. When her mom came in later, her daughter informed her that the her doll “needed air” so the backpack had to stay unzipped. Her mom smiled and said how cute her daughter was. I was worried, of course, that I might have caused trouble. But this little girl’s mom was relaxed…not like your mom. I went on to help the little girl glue beads onto a sick that had a number on it. I helped her count out the exact number and we got glue all over our hands. I, of course, brought out my hand wipes to clean both of us up and anyone else, too. One little girl had four items glued to a stick that had a “2” on it. I came very close to pulling off the superfluous items and helping her attach some of them to the “5” stick. Luckily, I realized it wasn’t that important. I actually let it go. It was such a paramount moment that I decided to write it down in this blog post. (I know you’re proud of me.)

Being in that class reminded me of when you all were that little. I wasn’t the relaxed mom at all. I helped you re-arrange objects to get them on right; I encouraged you to keep things in order, to stay in the lines when coloring. I had you erase whole rows of handwriting to put in that word you left out. I tried to be cheerful about it, but did my smile make the work any easier? No, it didn’t. I am afraid that sometimes I was more like a dictator than a loving mother and teacher.

I feel terrible about those days because I do love you, and I want my actions to say as much. As a young girl,  when I sat in my room, reading and daydreaming, I dreamed about you. Well, I didn’t know what you would look like, but I hoped that the Lord would let me have children. As I grew, I realized that not everyone is able to see this dream fulfilled. I was prepared for the worst. To my delight, the Lord gave me not one, but five of you! From the moment I held each one of you, I was filled with joy and a tinge of concern. I considered this a very special job, and I wanted to do it right. I wanted to teach you to take care of yourself, and others. I wanted you to learn to dream big, and work hard; to be kind, and to be tough. Most of all, I wanted to point you to the Lord. I now see that my actions probably did the opposite many times.

I’m sorry that I’m a stressed-out mom. I’m sorry I fret over silly things like if you’ll have enough water bottles to see you through the hot day, or that you have insect repellent and sunscreen on at soccer practice. I’m sorry I make you sit up straight at church and wear a jacket in 60 degree weather. I’m sorry I complain about how dirty you got your pants, or how much milk you drink – all the while making sure you wear clean pants and drink plenty of milk. I wish I could be the mom that I dreamed I would be, because you certainly have fulfilled all of my dreams about you.

It’s okay if one day you tell your children (or your friends) that your mom was kind of crazy –  you can even make the “loco” sign by your head. You can tell them all about my OCD tendencies and about all of my worrying and have a good laugh. I know it’s funny, and I hope you will always smile about it. I hope you’ll smile because you know that you had a stressed-out mom who loved you with every ounce of her being.

Forever yours,

Mother

Theological Term of the Week: Reconciliation

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This week’s term: Reconciliation – The effect of atonement. Essentially, reconciliation is propitiation or atonement in the New Testament sense. That is to say, by the death of Christ we are reconciled to, and at peace with God. Note: The same Greek word is rendered atonement and reconciliation, which is most often true in the Old Testament Hebrew as well. In Christ we have now received (Romans 5:11) the atonement which all the Old Testament gospel types promised. The proper conclusion should be that atonement in the New Testament sense should never be seen as less than total reconciliation to God. 

Last week’s term:  Propitiation – Essentially the same as atonement: covering, not in the sense of hiding, but in the sense of cancellation, as in mathematical or financial reconciliation.

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The Tecarta Bible App

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I just had to drop in and write about the Tecarta Bible App available from the Apple store. I paid about $4.99 for my app which uses the King James Version, but there is also a version that is free. I use it on my iPhone and iPad mini. It’s a good Bible app, very easy to use, with lots of highlighting and note-taking capabilities. But the main thing I wanted to share about it is the dramatized reading available on the app! It’s a new feature with which I have fallen in love! It used to only offer a computer-type voice reading the text. It now offers a distinct reading of the scriptures with background music and actors to portray the different parts. There is a voice for David, another for Jonathan, and so forth.

I have enjoyed listening to the dramatized reading while following along in my Bible (I like using the M’Cheyne Bible reading plan). It has really helped me to listen closer, and it’s made the Word of God seem more alive. It’s also nice to have someone else pronounce all the proper names in the Bible.😉

With love,

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